Showing posts with label fats. Show all posts

Top 6 Fitness Myths

fitness myths

1. Women who lift weights will get bulky muscles:
Not true; lifting weights, doing cardio and eating right are all three essential for losing weight. If you just want to tone up, perform each exercise between 10 and 20 reps. So keep your reps high and don’t be scared of weights; after lifting your metabolism will speed up for the next 48 hours.

2. Spot reducing is possible:
False; let’s take the stomach for example. Everyone has a “six-pack” in there somewhere - it is just a matter of exercising in general and eating right that gets rid of the fat on top. The best abs in the gym belong to the people who do a variety of things, not just working one area. If all you do is 500 crunches a day for the next two months, you will have the strongest abs that Nobody Will Ever See!

3. No pain, No gain:
No Way! This myth often scares people away, so let’s replace it with the truth. No Consistency, No Gain; consistency is the most important part of exercise, without it you are swimming upstream. Pain is not part of a safe routine; find the difference between pain and discomfort. But be ready to suck it up and deal with some sweat and discomfort; you need to push yourself, just not to the point of injury.

4. Exercising requires a hefty time commitment:
Once again absolutely false; exercise requires a commitment to consistency, not a large amount of time. It is much more beneficial to work out just 10 minutes every day of the week, than to work out for 2 hours once a week. Take pride in exercising more often without the burden of time.

5. If you exercise you can eat what ever you want:
This sounds more like an excuse: still not true. Food plays a huge role in how we feel, perform and go about our everyday routines. If you fill your body with fats and sugars all day any amount of exercise can’t counteract the damage. Don’t make things too complicated, just eat healthy and have the treats in moderation; don’t ruin all your hard work at the dinner table.

6. There is a “magic bullet” or quick fix out there somewhere:
Not even close; there is no magic pill, no 8-min Abs, and no equipment you can use on your couch. It took time to gain that weight and it will take time to lose it. So don’t fool yourself, get up and get to the gym.

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Sesame Oil


Sesame Oil

Sesame oil comes from an annual herb (Sesamum indicum). The plant is a warm weather plant that grows from the tropics to warm temperate regions. The major producing countries are China, India, Sudan, and Mexico. The seed is 40 to 60 percent oil and is used directly for food when it is cold pressed. The oil is also recovered by mixed expeller and solvent extraction. Sesame paste is a famous food in the lands along the eastern Mediterranean.

Sesame oil has very good oxidative constancy, which is thought to be related to sesamin or another unknown antioxidant in the native oil. When sesame oil is added to other oils for use in frying, the oxidative actions of the recipient oil are improved. The oil is pale yellow and without odor after refining, but also is sold in a darker version for use in Asian cooking.

The fatty acid composition has some similarities to peanut oil in that the levels of oleic acid and linoleic acid are quite similar. Typical composition of sesame oil is 10 percent palmitic acid, 5 percent stearic acid, 41 percent oleic acid, and 43 percent linoleic acid. Typical tocopherol values are 136 mg/kg a-tocopherol and 290 mg/kg ү- tocopherol for a total of 426 mg/kg.
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What are Macronutrients?

Macronutrients
Macronutrients consist of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. Contrary to common concept, each one is a necessary part of a healthy and successful diet regardless of your purposes. Some popular diets promote cutting either fats or carbohydrates out of one’s diet. At best, this only benefits you in the short term, since these diets are nearly impossible to follow permanently.

Each macronutrient plays a vital role in our health and well-being, and excluding any one of them will cause you to feel unfulfilled and tired. Whether we are trying to shed body fat and gain lean muscle mass or just trying to bulk up, our purposes are best met by eating a fair share of each of the macronutrients. Daily, we should aim to consume 1 - 1.5 grams of protein per pound of ideal bodyweight, with the rest of our calories coming from an even divide of good carbs and fats.
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Lard


Lard is the rendered fat from the pig (Sus scrofa). There are numerous parts of the world where lard has been a major food fat during centuries. One of these countries is China, or parts of Europe, and until recent times the United States. Lard has been a popular fat for pastry and for frying potato chips. In the America it can still be found in these foods in spite of the inappropriate consumer activist pressure to change it with partially hydrogenated vegetable shortenings. Lard can be either a firm fat or a soft fat depending on what the pig is fed.

Lard

Lard is more or less the corresponding of tallow in its usage, except that is has more unsaturated and can become rancid if not handled properly. Usually it is about 40 percent saturated, 50 percent monounsaturated, and 10 percent polyunsaturated fatty acids. This fat should be considered as a monounsaturated fat. Lard has between 2 and 3 percent palmitoleic acid, which as noted above possesses antimicrobial capacities. Most lard is home rendered or sold in certain ethnic stores Typical fatty acid composition is 1 percent myristic acid, 25 percent palmitic acid, 3 percent palmitoleic acid, 12 percent stearic acid, 45 percent oleic acid, 10 percent linoleic acid, and less than 1 percent linolenic acid. Typical tocopherol and tocotrienol content is reported to be 12 mg/kg a-tocopherol, 7 mg/kg ү-tocopherol, and 7 mg/kg atocotrienol.
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Corn Oil


Corn OiI

Corn oil comes from the whole corn (Zea mays L.), an annual herbaceous plant which is native to Central America. The oil makes up about 5 percent of the whole corn. Corn can be either wet milled to produce corn starch, corn sweeteners, and corn oil, or it can be dry milled to produce grits, flakes, meal, and oil. The crude corn oil that is obtained from the corn germ is supplementary refined by deodorization and removal of free fatty acids. It is yellow in color with a mild but usually individual odor. Refined corn oil is used as a salad and cooking oil or in making margarine. The refined oil has good flavor constancy, and it resists rancidity quite well even though it is highly unsaturated. Almost half of the world's corn oil is produced in the U.S., corn oil ranks above all domestically produced oils except soybean oil. Corn oil has been promoted as a food oil for at least 75 years in the U.S.

A typical fatty acid composition for corn oil is 12 percent palmitic acid, 2 percent stearic acid, 28 percent oleic acid, 57 percent linoleic acid, and 1 percent a-linolenic acid. Typical tocopherol levels in unrefined corn oil average 112 mg/kg a-tocopherol, 50 mg/kg p-tocopherol, 602 mg/kg ү-tocopherol, and 18 mg/kg б-tocopherol for a total of 782 mg/kg.
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Healing Properties of Fruits: Avocado


AvocadosAvocados have a cooling thermal nature they have a sweet flavor, build the blood and, harmonize the liver, lubricates the lungs and intestines. They are a natural source of lecithin, and are often considered a brain food. More than 80% of its caloric content is easily digested fat, primarily in the form of monounsaturated oils. Persons with cravings for oils but which digest poorly with most fatty foods can usually tolerate avocado. Avocados are rich in copper, which aids in red blood cell formation and it is a nutritious protein source often recommended for nursing mothers. Avocados are also a remedy for ulcers and are known to be effective for women in the skin care procedures.
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