Showing posts with label healthy fats. Show all posts

Sesame Oil


Sesame Oil

Sesame oil comes from an annual herb (Sesamum indicum). The plant is a warm weather plant that grows from the tropics to warm temperate regions. The major producing countries are China, India, Sudan, and Mexico. The seed is 40 to 60 percent oil and is used directly for food when it is cold pressed. The oil is also recovered by mixed expeller and solvent extraction. Sesame paste is a famous food in the lands along the eastern Mediterranean.

Sesame oil has very good oxidative constancy, which is thought to be related to sesamin or another unknown antioxidant in the native oil. When sesame oil is added to other oils for use in frying, the oxidative actions of the recipient oil are improved. The oil is pale yellow and without odor after refining, but also is sold in a darker version for use in Asian cooking.

The fatty acid composition has some similarities to peanut oil in that the levels of oleic acid and linoleic acid are quite similar. Typical composition of sesame oil is 10 percent palmitic acid, 5 percent stearic acid, 41 percent oleic acid, and 43 percent linoleic acid. Typical tocopherol values are 136 mg/kg a-tocopherol and 290 mg/kg ү- tocopherol for a total of 426 mg/kg.
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Healthy Fats and Oils


Healthy fats and oils are the ones that don't oxidize, or that are typically consumed prior to the oxidizing process. Those fats and oils that are oxidized are either:

  • not available for use as energy or for structural purposes because they are either in a polymerized not viable form or
  • they contain toxic components.
Naturally occurring fats and oils have been always consumed. They are habitually found to be the more saturated animal and plant fats. The more readily oxidizable oils historically have usually been consumed in their original packaging in the form of seeds and plants before they have been extracted and had a possibility to form oxidized products.

Oils and fats

Fats and oils to be avoided, in addition to partially hydrogenated vegetable fats, include any rancid or overheated fats and oils that have breakdown products such as oxidized fatty acids, oxidized sterols, peroxides, acrolein, hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds. These types of abused fats and oils are not secure. Free radicals are derived from the decomposition of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids. Ozone-induced reactive free radicals can interact with sulfhydryl groups in proteins as well as with unsaturated fatty acids and are negative to membranes. Oils, especially the polyunsaturated oils, that have been thought to be good, because they decrease serum cholesterol levels, actually proved to increase cholesterol in tissues; the reason being that the polyunsaturated fatty acids are deposited into the membranes and the body requires to put more cholesterol into these membranes to alleviate them and to preserve the melting point characteristics of the membrane.
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