Showing posts with label hospital. Show all posts

Is Your Loved One Being Treated Properly

hospital places

Having a friend or loved one in the hospital places them in a vulnerable position. Let's face it if the patient were healthy they wouldn't be in the hospital. It is up to you and your family to be their advocate to make sure they are getting proper patient care and to detect if there are signs of neglect. If you suspect that the patient is not getting proper care, here are a few things you can do and look for to determine whether or not your loved one is a victim of neglect:
  1. Sniff around: Literally use your nose to help determine signs of neglect. Although hospital smells are not appealing, you will quickly recognize which smells are normal hospital smells and which ones are not. Your sense of smell will help you to quickly determine if your loved one is getting the proper care in being bathed and cleaned regularly. If not it is a sign of patient neglect.
  2. Look for bedsores: If the patient has bedsores, you'd be right to suspect patient neglect. The staff is not adequately moving your loved one enough to prevent them.
  3. Examine the linen: If it is soiled and has been that way for an extended period of time, it is another sign of improper patient care.
  4. Determine if the patient is dehydrated or hungry:. Be careful with this one. If your loved one is refusing food and drink, that is not neglect, however, if they are complaining about hunger and you see that their water pitcher is constantly empty, it could be a sign of patient neglect.
  5. Talk to the staff: If they are overworked, harried, impatient and generally unhappy, there is a possibility that their workload precludes them from providing adequate patient care.
  6. Trust your instincts: Too many times people do not take their own instincts seriously. If you have a gut feeling that things aren't going right, more times than not, your gut is correct. Seek help.

A few tips:

  • Since visitors inadvertently become patient advocates, coordinate visitation so that the hospital staff and nurses are aware that your loved one has friends/family who care about their well being and are willing to do what it takes to ensure proper patient care.
  • If you suspect hospital neglect, speak to the staff. If it has gone beyond the point where speaking to the staff yields results, contact the Consumer Services Department of your state's Attorney General's office.
  • For more information visit on reporting suspected patient abuse, visit the Department of Labor website.

steroids oral

read more →

Frozen Shoulder

frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder affects only about two percent of the population but can greatly impact day to day life events such as brushing hair, opening doors or reaching up to retrieve something from a top shelf. It is most common in people between the ages of 40 and 60, and, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, can also strike people with diabetes, thyroid problems, Parkinson's disease or cardiac disease.

Dr. Jennifer Solomon, a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, which is well-known for its treatment of frozen shoulder, says, "It is also extremely common in perimenopausal women."

This suggests hormonal changes may cause joint stiffness associated with frozen shoulder.

The disorder often develops slowly, and in three stages.

Stage One: Pain increases with movement and is often worse at night. There is a progressive loss of motion with increasing pain. This stage lasts approximately 2 to 9 months.

Stage Two: Pain begins to diminish, and moving the arm is more comfortable. However, the range of motion is now much more limited, as much as 50 percent less than in the other arm. This stage may last 4 to 12 months.

Stage Three: The condition begins to resolve. Most patients experience a gradual restoration of motion over the next 12 to 42 months; surgery may be required to restore motion for some patients.

No one has yet to pinpoint the exact cause of frozen shoulder. However, it likely involves an underlying inflammatory process and can develop after leaving the shoulder immobile for any period of time, such as after surgery or an injury.

A medical history and physical exam, including X-rays can usually diagnose frozen shoulder. Treatment options include ibuprofen and cortisone injections. Steroids can significantly reduce inflammation and pain and increase range of motion.

Physical therapy is also often recommended, and consists of stretching or range-of-motion exercises. Therapy can be conducted by a trained and licensed therapist or in the comfort of home without supervision. Surgery is seen as a last resort should conventional methods be unsuccessful.

The recently held 75th Annual Meeting Podium Presentations by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons concluded that frozen shoulder is often misdiagnosed when the real culprit to pain and loss of motion is a tumor localized inside the bone or in the scapular region. These surgeons cautioned that a misdiagnosis can cause a significant delay in treatment. Patients should ask their physicians to consider all options.

buy steroids koh samui

read more →

10 Tips For Day Surgery Procedure Patients

day surgery procedure

Day Surgery admission enables a surgical procedure to be undertaken with preparation, recovery and discharge home all on the same day. As successful Day Surgery is a streamlined and time-efficient process, the patient should be well-prepared and organised to minimise delays and maximise safety. Follow these ten handy tips that address areas of concern for patients and staff to achieve a Day Surgery procedure experience that runs smoothly from start to finish.

1. Day Surgery Information is Important

  • Patients must read the pre-surgery instructions provided by the hospital or Day Surgery Unit.
  • Always follow exactly the advice given by the doctor and hospital.
  • Patients should arrive on time. Day Surgery Unit schedules are carefully arranged. Check where and when the patient needs to present. Allow time for traffic, parking and finding the location of the Day Surgery centre within the hospital.

2. X-rays and Scans

  • The most recent X-rays and scans of the area on which surgery will be performed should always be brought to hospital.
  • Surgery may be cancelled if the surgeon cannot access the images.

3. Fasting For Day Surgery Procedures

  • Patients must remember to keep fasting before surgery, following the times given by the doctor or hospital. Fasting for surgery requires abstaining from all food and drink including throat lozenges, cough syrups, bubblegum and dissolvable sweets.
  • If food or drink is consumed by mistake, patients should note the time and inform the Day Surgery nurse on arrival. This is of extreme importance as insufficient fasting time before anaesthetic has the potential to cause life-threatening complications.

4. Medications and Day Surgery

  • If fasting from midnight for surgery, it is usual for patients to take their morning medications with a sip of water, but always follow the instructions given by the doctor or hospital. These instructions may include stopping some medications days before surgery, especially if they promote bleeding, and other medications like diuretics (fluid tablets) may be with-held on surgery day only. Bring medications to hospital if clarification of the instructions is needed.
  • Diabetic patients will not be eating before surgery so should have instructions from the doctor regarding with-holding diabetic medications and/or reduction of insulin dosage. The patient’s blood glucose level will be checked at regular intervals by the Day Surgery nurse. If the pre-surgery patient notices any symptoms of hypo-glycaemia they should alert the nurse immediately.

5. Provide Patient Information to the Day Surgery Nurse

Patient safety and well-being will be enhanced if this information is prepared for Day Surgery
  • a list of the regular medications the patient takes
  • the date that any medications were ceased before surgery
  • any patient allergies
  • any pain-killers taken on surgery day before arriving at hospital
  • a list of phone numbers of the person (plus back-ups) to collect patient after recovery from the Day Surgery procedure.

6. Sight and Hearing

  • Day Surgery patients who wear glasses or contact lenses should bring the corresponding case for safe storage as they cannot be worn to the operating theatre.
  • Patients who wear spectacles for reading should bring them to hospital as they may need to read or sign consent forms or paperwork.
  • Hearing aids should be worn to hospital so the doctors and nurses can communicate well with the patient before and after surgery.

7. Teeth

  • Dentures should be worn to hospital. A decision on whether to remove dentures will be made by the anaesthetist as dentures left in place may allow a better fit of the anaesthetic equipment.
  • For fragile partial plates or teeth on wire fittings removal before surgery may be safer so bring a case for storage. If patients have any loose teeth or removable capped teeth they should inform the Day Surgery nurse.

8. Personal Care Before Day Surgery

  • Surgery patients should shower in the morning on the day of operation. Depending on the procedure to be done and the hospital protocols, patients may be asked to use an anti-bacterial wash. Menstruating patients should use pads not tampons.
  • Loose clothing should be worn to make it easier to dress and be comfortable after surgery.
  • Makeup or nail polish should not be worn for Day Surgery procedures.

9. Possessions

  • Patients can minimise stress by not bringing money or valuable items to hospital. Mobile telephones are not necessary as the Day Surgery nurse will contact the relative or friend on the patient’s behalf to advise of discharge time.
  • Jewellery and body piercings should not be worn as they will have to be removed before surgery. The Day Surgery nurse cannot take responsibility for valuables while the patient is in theatre or recovering from anaesthetic after surgery.

10. Discharge Time Expectations

  • Day Surgery patients should not expect any discharge time quoted to be definite; it can only be an estimate as discharge time is dependent on known and unknown variables. Patients will avoid undue stress if they relax and anticipate Day Surgery may take the whole day, perhaps into the evening, and refrain from making arrangements based on exact time-frames for discharge.

buy good quality steroids

read more →