Showing posts with label injuries prevention. Show all posts

Periodization of Workouts


Many athletes and bodybuilders do huge amounts of training programs with little regard to their effects or advantages. It does little good to do 20 sets of 20 reps in the squat if you can’t walk for a week or get injured. Smart athletes practice efficient programs that bring results. More does not mean necessarily better. Insufficient recovery interferes with the force generating ability of muscle and training adaptation.

Workout

Periodization of training uses different combinations of resistance, reps, rest intervals, and sets in the training program. It varies the training motivation, allows adequate recuperation between workouts, and methodically prepares athletes for intense training sessions.

Brazilian scientists found that a nonlinear periodization model which in essence is varied high-intensity and high-volume workouts in the same cycle, was superior to linear periodization containing high-volume and low-intensity, to low-volume and high-intensity over several weeks or constant load training. The ideal mixture of exercise and rest depends on the goal of the program and the flexibility of the athlete.Bodybuilders should use programs that make them work hard, provide sufficient rest, and then make them work hard all over again.
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Safeguard the Achilles

Achilles tendon
One of the most painful tendon injuries is Achilles. But there are also ways to avoid these injuries. Here are some of them:

  • You’ll feel a burning and piercing in the tendon above your heel and it can even make a crackling sound when you move it. Any higher up your calf and it’s more likely that you’ve strained or pulled a muscle. Rupturing your Achilles tendon is a exceptionally painful experience and you’ll know when you’ve done it.
  • Your Achilles tendon connects your calf muscles to your heel bone and is made of thousands of individual fibers of collagen. Restricted blood flow to this area slows repair and pain will worsen if you keep training.
  • Four important factors in healing the Achilles are: rest, ice, compression and elevation. If your tendon is harmed take a break from all weight bearing sport (except swimming) for at least 2 weeks. You can recover from mild injury in a couple of weeks but a severe one can take 5 months.
  • In order to prevent Achilles injury in the first place Increase your running, cycling or rowing distance by no more than 5% each week and if your feet turn inwards when you run, buy inner soles or orthotics to correct this. Also try running on grass and stretching your calves after workouts to keep them flexible, then add the strength moves to your routine.
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Warming Up Tips


Warm Up

If before workout you fail to warm up, you are risking injury. You need to get the blood flow started and to loosen your muscles. There are a few recommended practice lifts with almost no weight. Here are some tips to warm up the muscles:

  • Pecs/Triceps- Do a few benches with just the bar, and also a few cable pressdowns with about10pds.
  • Biceps- Do a few curls with just the bar, then add 30pds and warm up with that.
  • Legs- Do some light squats with just the bar and some light squats.
  • Upper back- Do some light lat pulldowns to stretch your lats. 

Many bodybuilders and athletes, when warming up, increase gradually the weight up. For example, for the bench press they warm up with just the bar, then 145, then 180, then 200, and then begin their real sets. While there is nothing really wrong with this many elite bodybuilders avoid these types of warm-ups because you’re expending energy that could be used for lifting. It is better to keep the warm-ups sweet and simple. Stretch the muscles and get the blood flowing using a light weight, then begin with your real workout. In this case, for the bench press it would be advisable to warm up with just the bar, then 145pds, and then start the workout.
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