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What is Poison Ivy and How to Treat It

Poison Ivy

Poison ivy is known as toxicodendron radicans. It is a plant the grows on a vine or shrub. Poison ivy grows in nearly every state in the United States and in some Canadian provinces. Some people are highly allergic to poison ivy. Here are some tips on what to look for and how to treat it.

What Poison Ivy Looks Like

Poison ivy either grows down low on the ground or in a hairy climbing vine attached to something like a tree. It is a plant that grows in leaves of three from a stem. The leaves are light to dark green and in the fall turn a reddish color.

When a person touches a poison ivy plant, the oil from the plant called urushiol sticks to the skin. Within a couple of days of contact with the ivy, a person will start to get red rash and it will be swollen. A few days after the rash starts, blisters will start popping up and will be itchy. Do not scratch it. It could become infected.

How to Treat Poison Ivy

When a person knows they have come in contact with poison ivy, they should wash the area with plain cool water as soon as possible. Do not use soap to wash the exposed area. Since urushiol is an oil, the soap will make it move around on the body. After washing with just plain cool water, they can then take a shower with soap and warmer water. The key is to get the oil off of the body as soon as possible. Wash any clothing or shoes that have come in contact with the poison ivy as well.

Some people are highly allergic to the plant and have to get medical treatment for it. If the person starts to run a fever, has a rash on the face or around the genitals, or the rash does not go away, it is a good time to see the doctor. With others, it is just a matter of weeks before the rash will go away on its own.

Just remember that the poison ivy oils can be carried on the family pet, clothes, shoes and any other thing that can come in contact with the plant. If someone is burning the ivy plant, do not breath in the smoke. as this can cause a rash as well.

For more information about poison ivy read treating poison ivy organically and poison ivy.

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Sesame Oil


Sesame Oil

Sesame oil comes from an annual herb (Sesamum indicum). The plant is a warm weather plant that grows from the tropics to warm temperate regions. The major producing countries are China, India, Sudan, and Mexico. The seed is 40 to 60 percent oil and is used directly for food when it is cold pressed. The oil is also recovered by mixed expeller and solvent extraction. Sesame paste is a famous food in the lands along the eastern Mediterranean.

Sesame oil has very good oxidative constancy, which is thought to be related to sesamin or another unknown antioxidant in the native oil. When sesame oil is added to other oils for use in frying, the oxidative actions of the recipient oil are improved. The oil is pale yellow and without odor after refining, but also is sold in a darker version for use in Asian cooking.

The fatty acid composition has some similarities to peanut oil in that the levels of oleic acid and linoleic acid are quite similar. Typical composition of sesame oil is 10 percent palmitic acid, 5 percent stearic acid, 41 percent oleic acid, and 43 percent linoleic acid. Typical tocopherol values are 136 mg/kg a-tocopherol and 290 mg/kg ү- tocopherol for a total of 426 mg/kg.
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Corn Oil


Corn OiI

Corn oil comes from the whole corn (Zea mays L.), an annual herbaceous plant which is native to Central America. The oil makes up about 5 percent of the whole corn. Corn can be either wet milled to produce corn starch, corn sweeteners, and corn oil, or it can be dry milled to produce grits, flakes, meal, and oil. The crude corn oil that is obtained from the corn germ is supplementary refined by deodorization and removal of free fatty acids. It is yellow in color with a mild but usually individual odor. Refined corn oil is used as a salad and cooking oil or in making margarine. The refined oil has good flavor constancy, and it resists rancidity quite well even though it is highly unsaturated. Almost half of the world's corn oil is produced in the U.S., corn oil ranks above all domestically produced oils except soybean oil. Corn oil has been promoted as a food oil for at least 75 years in the U.S.

A typical fatty acid composition for corn oil is 12 percent palmitic acid, 2 percent stearic acid, 28 percent oleic acid, 57 percent linoleic acid, and 1 percent a-linolenic acid. Typical tocopherol levels in unrefined corn oil average 112 mg/kg a-tocopherol, 50 mg/kg p-tocopherol, 602 mg/kg ү-tocopherol, and 18 mg/kg б-tocopherol for a total of 782 mg/kg.
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