Showing posts with label running. Show all posts

The Essence of Cardio


Cardio is essentially any type of intense activity that increases the heart rate. Bodybuilding could be named as a form of cardio, but most lifters prefer to just think of it as “lifting” and not “cardio”. It’s easier to think of it in this sense than to try and distinguish between the two. A thing to remember is the word “intense”. Walking around the house is a light-form of cardio. Running around the house is a true form of cardio. It’s important to distinguish the difference so that you don’t think by walking outside to collect the mail you are performing intense cardio.

Cardio

Common examples could be running (indoors and outdoors), swimming, biking, as well as boxing. Boxing also helps to develop the shoulders and the lats and burn off calories. A common mistake bodybuilders make is performing cardio each and every day. Remember you should limit yourself to a maximum of 2 hours of intense cardio a week. Remember, when you are doing cardio you are converting muscle, as well as fat, into energy. Too much cardio and you will start to lose some of your gains.
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Iced Water to Run Faster


Iced Water

Simply holding a bottle of water when you go for a run can help you make the exercise easier. But you need to make sure there’s some ice in the water, because room-temperature water will not work.

A new study at Stanford University in the US made the astonishing discovery by examining overweight women who had problems overheating during exercise. Researchers discovered that holding a bottle of cold water helped them to maintain a low core temperature, increasing their endurance. Eventually, this meant that they ran faster – and burned more fat – than subjects who didn’t get the cold bottles to hold. As high core temperature is a important factor for reducing endurance in all athletes, there is no reason why you can’t use this easy trick to counteract it. Its effects will be particularly obvious on hot summer days.
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The Best Warm-Up


Here is an example of warm up, you can use before the workout session:
Before you start your workout, you need to do some preparation or you'll risk injury as well as be able to make fewer demands of your body – and so get less out. But stretch before you're warm and you can do even more damage. So you need to get blood pumping through the muscles you want to work.

Upper body - Three minutes on the rower or Nordic ski machine, working at 50-60% of your maximum effort level. You should finish slightly out of breath, but nothing more than that. Then do the dynamic stretches.
Lower body - Three minutes on the running or step machine working at 50-60% of your maximum effort level. You should finish slightly out of breath, but nothing more than that. Then do the dynamic stretches.
Outside - If you're miles from any cardio equipment, go for a 2-minute jog and then do the dynamic stretches below.


Warm-up Exercises and Stretches description:
Walking lunge with twist. Stand with your hands clasped against your chest. Step forward with your right foot into a lunge and twist your head and shoulders to the right. Reverse the movement to push back to the starting position, then lunge with your left foot and twist to the left. Perform 10 lunges with each leg.

Overhead squat to calf raise. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms straightened overhead. Lower your body until your thighs are parallel to the ground, then push back up and rise onto the balls of your feet at the top of the move. Do 10 repetitions.

Upper body trunk rotation. With your feet shoulder-distance apart, stand with your back straight and knees a little bent. Start swinging your arms across your body at waist height - you should feel this mostly in your lower back. Move your arms higher to around shoulder-level to feel a stretch through your middle back. Now raise your arms to above head-height to feel the stretch in your upper back. Repeat each 10 times, ‘squeezing' slightly further each time to really feel the stretch.
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Train Your Lungs


Running. When you're out on the cardio trail, 80% of the work is done by your diaphragm. Several reasearches demonstrated that strengthening your diaphragm improves your breathing and your endurance. To exercise your diaphragm, it is advisable to practice coordinated breathing. Start by breathing in for two steps and breathe out for the next two. Advance to three-three, then finally four-four.

Lungs Training

Swimming. Breathing in less water is a good place to start and fewer breaths will get you from end to end quicker. Studies at the A study found that swimmers who decrease the frequency of their breaths improve the delivery of oxygen to their muscles. Build up your lung power by increasing the number of strokes per breath, until you can finally manage eight strokes.

Lungs Training

Cycling. Many professional cyclers have a lung capacity of eight litres, which is two litres above average. Although this in part depends on genetics, you can train yourself to be more efficient. Use a weightlifting technique of long, slow exhalation when doing endurance work. Because cycling is basically one long push, inhaling fast and deep prior to slowly breathing out when lifting copies the demands on your muscles and lungs when cycling.

Lungs Training

Soccer. It is important how fast your lungs swap carbon dioxide for oxygen and how fast blood delivers that oxygen to your muscles. The upper level at which training can be sustained for prolonged periods is known as the anaerobic threshold and in Premiership footballers this has been measured at a massive 77%. Improve your breathing Performing soccer activities, but warm-up thoroughly first.

Lungs Training
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