Showing posts with label weight lifting. Show all posts

Top 6 Fitness Myths

fitness myths

1. Women who lift weights will get bulky muscles:
Not true; lifting weights, doing cardio and eating right are all three essential for losing weight. If you just want to tone up, perform each exercise between 10 and 20 reps. So keep your reps high and don’t be scared of weights; after lifting your metabolism will speed up for the next 48 hours.

2. Spot reducing is possible:
False; let’s take the stomach for example. Everyone has a “six-pack” in there somewhere - it is just a matter of exercising in general and eating right that gets rid of the fat on top. The best abs in the gym belong to the people who do a variety of things, not just working one area. If all you do is 500 crunches a day for the next two months, you will have the strongest abs that Nobody Will Ever See!

3. No pain, No gain:
No Way! This myth often scares people away, so let’s replace it with the truth. No Consistency, No Gain; consistency is the most important part of exercise, without it you are swimming upstream. Pain is not part of a safe routine; find the difference between pain and discomfort. But be ready to suck it up and deal with some sweat and discomfort; you need to push yourself, just not to the point of injury.

4. Exercising requires a hefty time commitment:
Once again absolutely false; exercise requires a commitment to consistency, not a large amount of time. It is much more beneficial to work out just 10 minutes every day of the week, than to work out for 2 hours once a week. Take pride in exercising more often without the burden of time.

5. If you exercise you can eat what ever you want:
This sounds more like an excuse: still not true. Food plays a huge role in how we feel, perform and go about our everyday routines. If you fill your body with fats and sugars all day any amount of exercise can’t counteract the damage. Don’t make things too complicated, just eat healthy and have the treats in moderation; don’t ruin all your hard work at the dinner table.

6. There is a “magic bullet” or quick fix out there somewhere:
Not even close; there is no magic pill, no 8-min Abs, and no equipment you can use on your couch. It took time to gain that weight and it will take time to lose it. So don’t fool yourself, get up and get to the gym.

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Myofibrillar Hypertrophy

Myofibrils or muscle fibrils are  basic rod-like units of a muscle. Muscles are composed of tubular cells called myocytes, also known as muscle fibers, and these cells in turn contain many chains of myofibrils. They are created during embryo development in a process known as myogenesis.

Myofibrillar hypertrophy leads to increased levels of actin and myosin which are contractile proteins in myofibrils. In more simple terms, when you lift heavy weights and force new muscle to stress (progressive overload – increase of the weights during every workout is made for myofibrillar hypertrophy), your body will respond by improving the contractility of the muscles.

Muscle Hypertrophy


Using the muscle fibers (motor units) in exercises increases the hypertrophy of myofibrils, which increases the power of muscle contraction, increased strength and allows progressively increasing load, resulting in even greater hypertrophy of myofibrils.

The stronger your fast-muscle fibers are, the stronger is the neuromuscular response and thus you can lift heavier weights that you can overcome intense exercises.


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The Essence of Cardio


Cardio is essentially any type of intense activity that increases the heart rate. Bodybuilding could be named as a form of cardio, but most lifters prefer to just think of it as “lifting” and not “cardio”. It’s easier to think of it in this sense than to try and distinguish between the two. A thing to remember is the word “intense”. Walking around the house is a light-form of cardio. Running around the house is a true form of cardio. It’s important to distinguish the difference so that you don’t think by walking outside to collect the mail you are performing intense cardio.

Cardio

Common examples could be running (indoors and outdoors), swimming, biking, as well as boxing. Boxing also helps to develop the shoulders and the lats and burn off calories. A common mistake bodybuilders make is performing cardio each and every day. Remember you should limit yourself to a maximum of 2 hours of intense cardio a week. Remember, when you are doing cardio you are converting muscle, as well as fat, into energy. Too much cardio and you will start to lose some of your gains.
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Warming Up Tips


Warm Up

If before workout you fail to warm up, you are risking injury. You need to get the blood flow started and to loosen your muscles. There are a few recommended practice lifts with almost no weight. Here are some tips to warm up the muscles:

  • Pecs/Triceps- Do a few benches with just the bar, and also a few cable pressdowns with about10pds.
  • Biceps- Do a few curls with just the bar, then add 30pds and warm up with that.
  • Legs- Do some light squats with just the bar and some light squats.
  • Upper back- Do some light lat pulldowns to stretch your lats. 

Many bodybuilders and athletes, when warming up, increase gradually the weight up. For example, for the bench press they warm up with just the bar, then 145, then 180, then 200, and then begin their real sets. While there is nothing really wrong with this many elite bodybuilders avoid these types of warm-ups because you’re expending energy that could be used for lifting. It is better to keep the warm-ups sweet and simple. Stretch the muscles and get the blood flowing using a light weight, then begin with your real workout. In this case, for the bench press it would be advisable to warm up with just the bar, then 145pds, and then start the workout.
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Bodybuilding and Cardiovascular Health



Cardiovascular health is very important for bodybuilders and anabolic steroid-using athletes. As we know certain anabolic-androgenic steroids are associated with unfavorable changes in cholesterol, heart attacks and heart failure are some of the most frequent causes of sudden death or serious injuries. Elite bodybuilders and many other anabolic steroids users have suffered heart problems.

The term”Cardiovascular” refers to the heart and the blood vessels. Heart damage is generally caused by ischemia (oxygen deprivation) but can also be electrical in nature, as the heartbeat is generated by an internal conduction system that accelerates and decelerates to meet the circulatory command of the body. When the electrical signal is disrupted, the heart does not beat well or if the disruption is severe enough, may not beat at all. Ischemic damage of the heart s often due to a increase of plaque in the arteries, but may also be due to inappropriate vasoconstriction. Many abusers of cocaine suffered heart attacks due to coronary vasoconstriction, even though their arteries were completely healthy.

Bodybuilding and Cardiovascular Health
When ischemia is mild-to-moderate and long-term, the body grows new blood vessels to cut down the distance between active cells and near capillaries. A person who lives in the mountains likely has a higher capillary density than a person who lives on the beach at sea level. This density is a measure a measure of how branched the circulation is to provide oxygen. Many endurance athletes sleep in individual chambers that copy living in the mountains. This increases their red blood cell supply by stimulating the hormone erythropoietin, and probably excites new blood vessel growth. Many cancer drugs kill tumors by slowing down the blood vessel growth, starving the malignant tumors of oxygen and nutrients.
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Weight Training Increases Arterial Stiffness

Weight Training

Lifting weights can eventually damage cardiovascular health by hardening blood vessel walls and decreasing their aptitude to stretch and contract as the heart pumps blood through them. Even a single weight workout increases blood vessel stiffness. Weight-trained bodybuilders have stiffer arteries than people who don’t lift weights. This can boost the load on the heart when it tries to pump blood. Heart experts are concerned that years of building extreme muscles could have long-lasting effects on the blood vessels and heart. High blood pressure from weight training might also obstruct blood vessel metabolism and increase the threat of deadly blood vessel wall tears called aneurisms.

Japanese researchers found that upper-body weight training exercises increased arterial stiffness, while lower-body exercises didn’t. But it is just one study. In essence it is a known fact that stronger people live longer than weaker people. Also, a thorough review specialized sources failed to render even a solitary case study of a middle-aged or older adult athlete who died from an aneurism while weight training.
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The Role of Spotter


A spotter during your training can be either of valuable benefit or totally useless. An adequate spotter will know when you are in trouble on your reps and require extra assistance. A bad spotter will either not recognize if you are in trouble or will spot you from the very beginning. Remember that you want to be lifting weights and if the spotter is helping you on each rep, it means two people are doing the same job.

An example of a good spotter would be the exercising on the bench press. A good spotter will support you unrack the bar for you not to waste a lot of energy with this exercise. The spotter will hold it while you are stabilizing yourself, then take away themselves from the process when you are ready to carry on with the exercise. They’ll only help if you’re struggling on a rep, or when the bar might be slipping from out of your hands.

Training with Spotter

One common mistake is for people to become dependent on their spotters, almost to the degree that they’ll refuse to do a curl without someone spotting them. This is a poor trap to fall into. Remember, a flourishing bodybuilder has a strong mental game plan. They can lift all by themselves. A spotter should only be used to watch your form or offer assistance on dangerous exercises (squat, benching). These exercises are dangerous because, if you become stuck at the bottom and no one is there, you’re going to have a few problems racking the weight or it will crush you.
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