Weight Training Increases Arterial Stiffness

Weight Training

Lifting weights can eventually damage cardiovascular health by hardening blood vessel walls and decreasing their aptitude to stretch and contract as the heart pumps blood through them. Even a single weight workout increases blood vessel stiffness. Weight-trained bodybuilders have stiffer arteries than people who don’t lift weights. This can boost the load on the heart when it tries to pump blood. Heart experts are concerned that years of building extreme muscles could have long-lasting effects on the blood vessels and heart. High blood pressure from weight training might also obstruct blood vessel metabolism and increase the threat of deadly blood vessel wall tears called aneurisms.

Japanese researchers found that upper-body weight training exercises increased arterial stiffness, while lower-body exercises didn’t. But it is just one study. In essence it is a known fact that stronger people live longer than weaker people. Also, a thorough review specialized sources failed to render even a solitary case study of a middle-aged or older adult athlete who died from an aneurism while weight training.
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Beat Sleeplessness With Cycling


Copious amounts of sleep may cause lethargy, but nevertheless sleep  is still a man’s most important friend when it comes to reducing stroke and risk of heart disorders However, over 25% of population experience some sort of insomnia and all of us experience troubled nights at some point in our lives.

Out of several different activities tested in a research, cycling at 75% of your maximum heart rate, for 20 minutes, four times a week was found to be the most successful way of bringing your sleeping habits under control.

Cycling
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Healing Properties of Fruits: Apricot

Apricot

Apricot is a fruit that has neutral thermal nature. It has a sweet-and-sour flavor. Apricot has the property to moisten the lungs and it increases the fluids. It is mainly used for dry throat, thirst, asthma, and other lung conditions when there is fluid deficit. Because of its high copper and cobalt content, it is usually used to treat anemia. Apricots originated in China, where they are considered weakening if consumed in large quantities. They must be used carefully during pregnancy, and avoided in cases of diarrhea.
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Green Superheroes


Romaine. (Cancer Prevention) This celery-flavored green is one of the best vegetable sources of beta-carotene—712 micrograms per cup. Recent studies showed that high levels of beta-carotene impends the growth of prostate cancer cells by 50 percent.

Greens

Arugula (Bone Health). One cup of these mustard-flavored leaves has 10 percent of the bone-building mineral that can be in a glass of whole milk and 100 percent less saturated fat. There’s also some magnesium which assure more protection against osteoporosis.

Greens

Watercress (Protects the Pipes). It’s a pepper-flavored filter for your body. Watercress contains phytochemicals that may stop cigarette smoke and other airborne pollutants from causing lung cancer.

Greens

Endive (Heart Health). It’s slightly bitter but it offers twice the fiber of iceberg lettuce. A cup of endive also provides almost 20 percent of your day by day requirement of folate. People who don’t get enough of this vital B vitamin may have a 50 percent greater risk of developing heart disease.

Greens

Mustard greens (Brain Booster). These spicy, crunchy greens are packed with the amino acid tyrosine. In a recent study, there was found that of consumption a tyrosine-rich meal an hour before taking a test assists people to significantly improve both their memories and their concentration.

Greens

Spinach (Eye Health). Spinach is a top source of lutein and zeaxanthin, two influential antioxidants that protect your vision from the negative effects of old age. A study found that frequent spinach eaters had a 43 percent lower threat of age-related macular degeneration.

Greens

Kohlrabi (Pressure Control). Kohlrabi tastes like the love child from a tryst between a cabbage and a turnip. Each serving contains nearly 25 percent of your daily necessity of potassium (to help keep a lid on your blood pressure), along with glucosinolate, a phytochemical that may avoid some cancers.

Greens
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Reactive Strength


Reactive Strength represents the capacity to change quickly from eccentric to concentric exercises. An example would be landing on the ground and right away jumping upward. Another example is displayed when throwing punches in combination.

After throwing a right cross, you will instantly reverse the motion of your body as you follow with a left hook. Reactive strength utilizes the stretch shortening cycle. The stretch reflex begins with an eccentric phase, where the muscle increases in length under tension. During this stage, the body stores prospective kinetic energy. If a concentric action instantaneously follows the eccentric action, the kinetic energy will increase the force of the concentric contraction. The stretch shortening cycle is similar to the action of a rubber band.

Reactive Strength

When you stretch a rubber band (eccentric), you accumulate energy. As soon as you let go the band (concentric), the energy is utilized with a strong snapping action. The stored energy created by the tension enhances the strength of the following contraction.
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Vegetable Juices


Vegetable Juices

Beetroot. Beetroot juice has a strong taste and a dark, red colour and is usually mixed with other juices such as carrot, cucumber, apple or celery. It is an excellent all-round ionic and blood and kidney cleanser, as are the green beetroot leaves, if you can get bold of them. Cooked beetroots can he used for juicing, but raw are far belter. Beetroot juice is rich in vitamins B1, B2, B6 and folic acid (part of the B group), and the minerals calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium. sodium and zinc.

Carrot. The thick, bright orange juice of carrots is a mainstay of mixed vegetable juices, as its sweetness combines well with other varieties of juice. Drunk on Its own it has a slightly spicy taste and is delicious with a few sprigs of fresh chopped herbs. It is renowned for its ability 10 cleanse the liver of excess fats, and can aid digestion. Carrot juice is very high in beta-carotene, particularly so in more mature carrots, and rich in the minerals calcium and magnesium.

Celery. Celery juice has a slightly salty taste due to its high sodium content, and is more watery than other juices. It is known to have a calming effect on the nervous system, and reduces cravings for sweet foods, both of which are beneficial during a detox plan. Celery juke also has a diuretic effect and helps tackle fluid retention. It is especially rich in the minerals sodium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, chlorine and calcium.

Cucumber. Cucumber juice has a mild diuretic effect which can help reduce fluid retention. Because it is so watery ii makes an excellent mixer for thicker, more concentrated juices, such as beetroot spinach and watercress. Cucumber is high in the minerals potassium, chlorine, sulphur and calcium, and moderately high in the vitamin folic acid (part of the B group vitamins).

Spinach. Spinach juice is chock-full of vitamins, minerals and chlorophyll. As a result it is an extremely effective cleansing and strengthening ionic, particularly for the liver, me gall bladder, and the bloodstream. Because it is so concentrated and strong to the taste, spinach juice is mixed with other juices or drunk sparingly. You should not drink more than a couple of spinach juice cocktails each week, because it also contains oxalic acid, which can prevent the mineral calcium from being absorbed. Spinach is especially rich in vitamin C, vitamin B6, folic acid (pan of the B group of vitamins), beta-carotene, and the minerals calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium and sodium.
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