Legs Training Importance

Leg Muscles
Powerful legs are the foundation of an imposing physique. Strong, defined legs give your body symmetry and show off your overall strength. Many times, among athletes and bodybuilders there is a phenomenon of “leg avoidance” in weight training. It may be because leg exercises are not always considered easy or fun and many people desire to focus on their upper body to have big arms and chest.

But by neglecting the legs, you can actually slow your progress in other areas. Your body tends to want to increase proportionally. Train your legs hard and we know you’ll be surprised by the upper-body growth that is stimulated as a result. Another great thing about working legs is the fact that if you work them they will grow. That may sound obvious, but many people who make slower gains with their upper body find that getting their legs to develop is a quick process. Training legs with strength will also elevate your heart rate and allow you to burn fat more efficiently.
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What are Macronutrients?

Macronutrients
Macronutrients consist of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. Contrary to common concept, each one is a necessary part of a healthy and successful diet regardless of your purposes. Some popular diets promote cutting either fats or carbohydrates out of one’s diet. At best, this only benefits you in the short term, since these diets are nearly impossible to follow permanently.

Each macronutrient plays a vital role in our health and well-being, and excluding any one of them will cause you to feel unfulfilled and tired. Whether we are trying to shed body fat and gain lean muscle mass or just trying to bulk up, our purposes are best met by eating a fair share of each of the macronutrients. Daily, we should aim to consume 1 - 1.5 grams of protein per pound of ideal bodyweight, with the rest of our calories coming from an even divide of good carbs and fats.
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Healing Properties of Fruits: Orange

Oranges
Oranges have cooling thermal nature. This is a fruit with sweet-and-sour flavor, it is general tonic for weak digestion and poor appetite, oranges regenerate body fluids; helps cool and moisten those who are dry and over heated from disease processes, physical activity, or hot weather. Oranges have been precious for inflammatory, highly acidic diseases such as arthritis; they also help lower high fever; their vitamin C/ and bioflavonoid content advantages for those with weak gums and teeth. The peel has gi-stimulating, digestive, and mucus resolving actions similar to grapefruit peel above. The inner white lining, placed directly on the eyelids, helps to dissolve eye cysts. Tangerines make a good substitute for commercial oranges because they have many of the same properties but are sprayed less with chemicals.
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Post Workout Carbohydrates


Consuming food immediately after training, no longer than forty five minutes, the right type of nutrients has an massive impact on gaining lean muscular weight. Right after intense weight training, muscle cells are starving for replenishment. The prime fuel source for anaerobic activity is glycogen and after serious weight training studies have shown a nutrient partitioning action takes place. Starving muscle cells suck up glycogen like a sponge loading and making it in much greater quantities than usual. Take advantage of this by drinking a liquid source of simple carbohydrates like a pop or a carbohydrate drink. This is an exceptional time to satisfy your cravings for simple sugars and actually benefit from it.

Your bodies’ insulin response to eating the simple sugars will divide the simple sugars very efficiently into the muscle cells instead of fat cells when over eating carbohydrates. You can not only get away with eating more, it is helpful for muscle growth to do so.

Carbohydrates
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Lard


Lard is the rendered fat from the pig (Sus scrofa). There are numerous parts of the world where lard has been a major food fat during centuries. One of these countries is China, or parts of Europe, and until recent times the United States. Lard has been a popular fat for pastry and for frying potato chips. In the America it can still be found in these foods in spite of the inappropriate consumer activist pressure to change it with partially hydrogenated vegetable shortenings. Lard can be either a firm fat or a soft fat depending on what the pig is fed.

Lard

Lard is more or less the corresponding of tallow in its usage, except that is has more unsaturated and can become rancid if not handled properly. Usually it is about 40 percent saturated, 50 percent monounsaturated, and 10 percent polyunsaturated fatty acids. This fat should be considered as a monounsaturated fat. Lard has between 2 and 3 percent palmitoleic acid, which as noted above possesses antimicrobial capacities. Most lard is home rendered or sold in certain ethnic stores Typical fatty acid composition is 1 percent myristic acid, 25 percent palmitic acid, 3 percent palmitoleic acid, 12 percent stearic acid, 45 percent oleic acid, 10 percent linoleic acid, and less than 1 percent linolenic acid. Typical tocopherol and tocotrienol content is reported to be 12 mg/kg a-tocopherol, 7 mg/kg ү-tocopherol, and 7 mg/kg atocotrienol.
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Fat-Burning Foods: Cinnamon


Cinnamon

Cinnamon is an important and efficient product when it comes to weight loss. Here are some options on how on you can use it in your meals:

For Breakfast: Cinnamon toast
Stick 2 slices of whole wheat bread in the toaster. While you wait for the bread to pop up, mash a banana with 1/2 tsp of ground cinnamon. Spread the melted banana over the toasted bread. Your day just begun and you’re already trimming down your tummy.

For Lunch: Sweet potato soup
Fry a chopped onion and garlic in oil; stir in 1/2 tsp cinnamon and a pinch of chilli and ground ginger. Add 200g sweet potatoes and cook for 3 minutes. Pour in 100ml each of chicken stock and coconut milk; simmer for 8 minutes, then blend and have a healthy and delicious lunch.

For Dinner: Moroccan baked chicken
Brown 2 chicken thighs in oil. Then chop half an onion and carrot, and fry with 1 tsp each of cinnamon, paprika, cumin, garlic and ginger. Stick in 100g brown rice and put in a casserole dish with the chicken, a tin of tomatoes and 500ml stock. Cook at 200°C for 35 minutes.

For Dessert: Sweet and spicy quinoa
Simmer 75g quinoa with 1tsp cinnamon in 150ml water for 15 minutes. Stir in 110ml coconut; simmer for 10 minutes. Add 1/2 tbsp honey, a little of chopped nuts and another of mixed berries or chopped apple. All these should be cooked for 10 minutes.
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